Rovinj, Croatia

Rovinj, Croatia >>>

Located on Croatia’s Istrian peninsula in the Adriatic Sea, Rovinj is an archipelago of 20 islands with its Old Town set on a small peninsula. Narrow streets of cobblestone, stairways, arches and other interesting architecture make the Old Town a sightseeing adventure. Some of the Old Town’s historic gems include seven medieval city gates, the 12th century town clock and St. Euphemia’s Basilica, an imposing baroque church packed with many stunning art works. Also worth seeing are the scenic harbor, Carrera Street with its many shops and art galleries, and Grisia Street, which is lined with artists and souvenir vendors.

Cliffs of Moher

Moher, Ireland >>>

No visit to Ireland is complete without spending some time enjoying the view from on a high cliff overlooking the Atlantic, and the Cliffs of Moher take this experience to breathtaking new heights. Rising nearly 210 meters (700 feet) from the shoreline, the stretch of cliffs attracts almost one million visitors each year making it one of the most popular places to visit in Ireland. Understandably, access to the cliffs is restricted in windy weather. Boat tours offered at the pier in Doolin give visitors the opportunity to enjoy the cliffs from a different perspective.

Shaftesbury

Shaftesbury, United Kingdom >>>

This Dorset town is a definite charmer. One of its streets, Gold Hill, was featured in the iconic “Boy on Bike” TV advert directed by Ridley Scott for Hovis (a brand of bread in the UK) and you can see why: the steep, cobbled street is lined with rustic cottages on a backdrop of lush English countryside. It has been dubbed “one of the most romantic sights in England.” Adjacent to this picturesque street are the ruins of Shaftesbury Abbey, built in 888 AD by King Alfred.

Sydney Opera House

Sydney, Australia >>>

One of Australia’s famous landmarks, the Sydney Opera House is one of the world’s most prestigious performing arts centers. Regarded as a 20th century architectural masterpiece, the Sydney Opera House was designed and built by architect, Jørn Utzon, to reflect the image of a huge sailing ship. Though the name suggests it is used only as an opera house, the project comprises multiple performance venues. Of the many venues housed within the structure, some of the most significant are the Joan Sutherland Theatre, Drama Theatre, the multi-purpose Utzon Room and the Concert Hall, which houses the largest mechanical tracker-action organ in the world. Also part of the Sydney Opera House is the Forecourt, an open-air venue presenting many outdoor performances.

Geirangerfjord, Geiranger, Norway

Geiranger, Norway >>>

Geiranger fjord, Norway

Geiranger is the crown jewel of all the famous fjords of Norway. The snow-covered mountain peaks, the beautiful waterfalls, the lush green vegetation and the deep blue waters all add to the experience. The fjord can be explored by booking one of the 130 cruise ships that come here every year or taking the car ferry between Hellesylt and Geiranger, a small town that lies at the head of the Geiranger Fjord.

Bay of Kotor, Montenegro

Kotor, Montenegro >>>

One of the most popular day trips from Dubrovnik, the bay of Kotor, known to locals as Boka, is a long sleepy inlet off the Adriatic sea in southwestern Montenegro. Often mistaken as a southern fjord, this is actually an extinct river from the old Orjen plateau. Today, it has four separate gulfs and a number of ancient towns, as well as a few newer settlements. The water is spectacular for those who just want a water tour. If you go on land, of special note are Herceg Novi, a twelfth century town at the opening, the fortified city of Kotor and the picturesque city of Perast with its two small islets. There is no bad place to stop, however. With castles and gardens, monasteries, ancient buildings and much more, every moment in this bay is timeless, picturesque and breathtaking.

Three Days in Prague

Prague, Czechia >>>

The capital of Czech Republic, Prague is unlike any other European city. From the moment you set foot in this historic city, you will be engulfed by its haunting beauty, the gothic architecture, the baroque structures, and the surreal charm. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” Prague, unlike several other European cities, was never rebuilt during the 18th and 19th century, hence it still maintains its ornate spires, brightly colored buildings, and old-worldly appearance.

Prague, in the same category as Vienna and Budapest, has emerged to be one of the most visited cities in Central Europe, and has been regarded, for centuries, as the capital of the historic Bohemian region. In fact, it is said that the city is so beautiful even Hitler spared it during World War II!

Intersected by the Vltava River, Prague is home to over 1 million residents and sees hundreds and thousands of visitors each year. There is no dearth of tourist sites and things to do within this medieval jewel.

An important thing to note here is that Prague, like most European cities, has a Tourist Pass and a Tourist Card. But, the common verdict is not to use them since almost every place to visit can be reached on foot. However, if you do wish to travel by metro, you can purchase a metro pass that is valid from 30 minutes to 72 hours and can be bought at any metro station.

Day 1: The Old Town and River Cruising

Irrespective of where your hotel is in the city, the greatest and the most popular way to start your trip will be to get yourself acquainted with the history and architecture of Prague – two of the things it is most famous for. You can book a walking tour online or go on a self-guided walk. While the former is a great way to know the details about the city’s past from a local guide, the latter gives you the opportunity to explore the city according to your own pace and comfort.

Morning – Prague’s Old Town

Prague is best experienced on foot. Start your day with a filling breakfast at your hotel or at one of the many eateries around the Old Town Square, one of the most important sights of historic Prague. Walk through the square’s surrounding cobblestone lanes and be fascinated by the ancient architecture that runs around its entire perimeter. Admire the Church of Our Lady Before Tyn and the Astronomical Clock – the 3rd oldest clock of its kind built in 1410.

Then, make your way to the Jewish Quarter of the city where you can visit the synagogues and the Jewish Cemetery – regarded as the largest of its kind in Europe.

Next, visit the Clementinum which is known to be the largest compound in the city (after Prague castle) and houses many libraries and Baroque churches. Clementine was transformed into a Jesuit College in 1556 and later a University in 1654 which operated until 1773.

After all the walking that you have done throughout this busy morning, it’s time to rest in a Czech restaurant and enjoy a sumptuous local Czech lunch.

Afternoon – River Cruise and Charles Bridge

PRAGUE, CHEZH REPUBLIC – JAN 28, 2017: Prague river Vltava, Czech Republic.

If you do decide to book a walking tour, it’s best that you reserve a tour that includes a River Cruise so you can navigate through the waterways of old Prague. Either way, take a relaxing River Cruise and enjoy the beautiful sights that line the banks of the river. The cruise will take you to the impressive Charles Bridge – erected across the Vltava river under the reign of King Charles IV and the only way to cross the river until 1841.

How to Spend 3 Days in Prague
Last updated on January 25, 2018 in Czech Republic Leave a Comment

The capital of Czech Republic, Prague is unlike any other European city. From the moment you set foot in this historic city, you will be engulfed by its haunting beauty, the gothic architecture, the baroque structures, and the surreal charm. Known as the “City of a Hundred Spires,” Prague, unlike several other European cities, was never rebuilt during the 18th and 19th century, hence it still maintains its ornate spires, brightly colored buildings, and old-worldly appearance.

Prague, in the same category as Vienna and Budapest, has emerged to be one of the most visited cities in Central Europe, and has been regarded, for centuries, as the capital of the historic Bohemian region. In fact, it is said that the city is so beautiful even Hitler spared it during World War II!

Intersected by the Vltava River, Prague is home to over 1 million residents and sees hundreds and thousands of visitors each year. There is no dearth of tourist sites and things to do within this medieval jewel.

An important thing to note here is that Prague, like most European cities, has a Tourist Pass and a Tourist Card. But, the common verdict is not to use them since almost every place to visit can be reached on foot. However, if you do wish to travel by metro, you can purchase a metro pass that is valid from 30 minutes to 72 hours and can be bought at any metro station.

Day 1: The Old Town and River Cruising
Irrespective of where your hotel is in the city, the greatest and the most popular way to start your trip will be to get yourself acquainted with the history and architecture of Prague – two of the things it is most famous for. You can book a walking tour online or go on a self-guided walk. While the former is a great way to know the details about the city’s past from a local guide, the latter gives you the opportunity to explore the city according to your own pace and comfort.

Prague Old Towndreamstime/Helena Bilková
Morning – Prague’s Old Town
Prague is best experienced on foot. Start your day with a filling breakfast at your hotel or at one of the many eateries around the Old Town Square, one of the most important sights of historic Prague. Walk through the square’s surrounding cobblestone lanes and be fascinated by the ancient architecture that runs around its entire perimeter. Admire the Church of Our Lady Before Tyn and the Astronomical Clock – the 3rd oldest clock of its kind built in 1410.

Then, make your way to the Jewish Quarter of the city where you can visit the synagogues and the Jewish Cemetery – regarded as the largest of its kind in Europe.

Next, visit the Clementinum which is known to be the largest compound in the city (after Prague castle) and houses many libraries and Baroque churches. Clementine was transformed into a Jesuit College in 1556 and later a University in 1654 which operated until 1773.

After all the walking that you have done throughout this busy morning, it’s time to rest in a Czech restaurant and enjoy a sumptuous local Czech lunch.

Afternoon – River Cruise and Charles Bridge
Prague Cruise

If you do decide to book a walking tour, it’s best that you reserve a tour that includes a River Cruise so you can navigate through the waterways of old Prague. Either way, take a relaxing River Cruise and enjoy the beautiful sights that line the banks of the river. The cruise will take you to the impressive Charles Bridge – erected across the Vltava river under the reign of King Charles IV and the only way to cross the river until 1841.

Day 2: Malá Strana and Prague Castle

Begin your second day on the opposite side of the river and explore a few more historic sites that the “City of a Hundred Spires” has to offer.

Morning – Malá Strana and Kampa Island

After a delightful and refreshing breakfast, make your way across the Charles Bridge and walk for 5 minutes to arrive at Malá Strana, also known as Lesser Town. The area is known for its hilly terrain, gorgeous terracotta roofs, flamboyant architecture and splendid views of Prague along the Vltava River.

On your visit, explore Kampa Island – one of Prague’s hidden gems and considered the second most beautiful city island in the world. While in the area, take a moment to scribble a message on the John Lennon Wall.

Before you head towards the next extremely significant site, grab a nice lunch at one of the many restaurants that scatter Lesser Town.

Afternoon – Prague Castle

Just a 10-15 minutes’ walk from Malá Strana brings you at the door of one of the most iconic structures in Prague – Prague Castle. Take a moment to appreciate the grand exterior and then enter the premises of what is clearly the largest castle compound not just in the country but in the world. Explore the many palaces that date as far back as the 10th century. Walk through the Golden Lane and admire the many architectural geniuses that surround the area. St. Vitus Cathedral and St. George’s Basilica come highly recommended.

Evening – Charles Bridge at Night and Dinner with Live Entertainment

As the day almost comes to an end, walk back towards Charles Bridge one more time to enjoy the sight at night. The historic Prague Castle, adorned with lights, shines in the background as the usual hustle bustle of the day’s crowd fades away. Come here just after sunset to benefit from the “clearing sales” found at the few shops that still remain open at this time.

Finally, sit down at one of the many restaurants which offer live entertainment. Medieval Tavern and Café Mozart are great options.

Day 3: Museum Tour of Prague

Kickstart your day with a breakfast feast at one of the many cafes around the town. Ferdinanda, near the National Museum of Prague, comes highly recommended.

Morning – National Museum of Prague

Begin your day at the biggest museum in Czech Republic – the National Museum of Prague. Dominating the upper part of the Wenceslas Square, the Museum houses an enormous variety of exhibitions that depict the affluence of the country’s history, culture, and art. Built in 1818 and opened to the public in 1891, the Museum was one of the only few places in Prague to have been affected by World War II – two bombs were dropped here! Come here early in the morning to avoid the crowds which arrive later in the day.

Since you are at Wenceslas Square already, it is only logical that you explore the area a little bit more. Considered as one of Prague’s favorite communal places, the Square has unlimited opportunities for shopping, hanging out, and even a quick bite to eat.

Afternoon – Museum of Communism, Powder Tower, and Nuclear Bunker

From the end of WWII to the famous Velvet Revolution of 1989, Czechoslovakia was ruled by the Soviet Union communists who governed the citizens of the country rather brutally, arresting over 200,000 and killing over 300 inhabitants. The Museum of Communism, a short walk from the National Museum, captures the history of Czech’s agonizing past until the peaceful outbreak of the Velvet Revolution. Look out for the Lenin statue, a replica of a classroom from the era, and the sculptures of a man in progressive decay.

Just a couple of minutes from the museum is the well-known Powder Tower which, at 213 feet tall, was once used to store gunpowder and has a monumental Gothic entrance for Kings’ processions to the Old Town. Though the gunpowder reserve is gone, the entrance is still used for Coronation processions.

Now for something slightly different for your Prague itinerary. The next sight is to explore the ex-Soviet Nuclear Bunker, constructed during the Cold War and crammed with relics from that time – gas masks, army uniforms, dosimeters, and much more.

Evening – Club Hopping in the Party Central of Prague

It is strange to believe, but nearby the Nuclear Bunker are a plethora of popular bars, restaurants, and nightclubs which are frequented by locals and tourists alike.

Start at U Sudu (especially if you are travelling alone) which is a great place for a couple of world-famous beers of Prague and meeting new friends before you head out to a club. Then, depending on your choice of music, you could spend the rest of the night at Chapeau Rouge (house and club), Déjà vu (karaoke on Wednesdays), Lucerna (80’s and 90’s), and of course, Karlovy Lázně – one of the biggest music clubs in Central Europe!

Three Days in Vienna

Vienna, Austria >>>

The capital of Austria and the largest city in the country, Vienna is truly magical. No wonder it is considered extremely high amongst the world’s best cities to live in. With approximately 1.8 million people living in the city, Vienna is known to have the second-largest concentration of German speakers (first being Berlin).

Often dubbed as the “City of Music” because of its legendary musical legacy, Vienna is known to have played a significant role in the history of European music – starting at the Viennese Classicism and up until the early 20th century.

Also known as the “City of Dreams” (because of being Sigmund Freud’s birthplace – the first psycho-analyst in the world), Vienna is filled with history, architecture, music, art,, and so much beauty.

If you are in Vienna for an extended weekend or a small trip and only have 3 days in the city, you have to plan your days smartly so you get to explore all the important sights as well as have enough time for a bit of fun and entertainment.

One of the first things you should do is research online to see the features and benefits of a Vienna Card and Vienna Pass. While the Vienna Card has been in existence for many years and is the cheaper option, the Vienna Pass offers a lot of additional features that may be of interest (including unlimited use of hop-on-hop-off services throughout the duration of your pass validity and free entrance to over 60 top attractions) .

Exploring the Historic Center and Vienna Prater

Start your first day in the beautiful city of Vienna with a delightful Viennese breakfast. Le Bol is a cozy French café which serves mouth-watering breakfasts – you must try their Croque-Monsieur! Alternatively, you can visit L. Heiner for a typical Viennese breakfast of coffee and pastry.

Morning at St. Stephen’s Cathedral, Plague Column, and St. Peter’s Church

A short walk from both Le Bol and L. Heiner is the first attraction that you should visit. St. Stephen’s cathedral a.k.a. Stephansdom is one of the primary attractions in the city. You can take a guided tour (a must if you wish to visit the catacombs) or you can take yourself around the cathedral, the Treasury and finally to the South Tower. You can give the Treasury a miss if you wish to visit the Imperial Treasury later.

Just a couple of minutes’ walk from the cathedral is the next sight – the Column of Plague (Pestsäule) which was built in 1679 as a celebration of the end of the Great Plague epidemic that lasted from 1665 to 1666 and claimed about 1/4th of London’s population at the time.

Another couple of minutes and you will find yourself in front of St. Peter’s Church. Though not as grand as the Cathedral you visited before, the Church is a fine example of Baroque style churches that the city is famous for. They also host classical music concerts, in case you’d be interested.

Stop for a traditional Austrian lunch at Hopferi which also serves as a pub in case you wanted to grab an early afternoon beer before you continued your first day of exploring Vienna.

Afternoon at the Imperial Palace and the Rathaus

Hofburg, the former Imperial Palace, is home to three museums, the Imperial Apartments, the Silver Collection, and the Sisi Museum, which can all be all accessed with a single ticket to Hofburg.

Continue walking straight to the Imperial Treasury which is not only one of the finest museums in the city but is also home to one of world’s largest emeralds. A visit here requires a separate entry ticket.

About 10 minutes from the Treasury is the Austrian Parliament Building, a fine example of Greek architecture. This is where the Austrian Parliament has sat since the 19th century. Further ahead from the Parliament Building is the Rathaus, a.k.a. the City Hall. The structure looks especially spectacular after sunset.

Evening at Vienna Prater

Take the metro line from Rathaus station to get to Praterstern. The journey takes about 18 minutes but it is totally worth it to experience Vienna Prater, especially if you are traveling with your partner.

No trip to Vienna can be complete without a ride on the Giant Ferris Wheel located inside Vienna Prater, a gigantic amusement park. Whether you like amusement parks or not, being on a 212 feet high Ferris Wheel and enjoying a romantic dinner here will definitely be a special experience for you and your lover. There are several other restaurants, nightclubs and a bowling alley within the park if you don’t feel like heading back to your hotel too early.

Day 2: Museums and Food Markets

Begin your day with a hearty breakfast at Ulrich and then make your way for a day filled with history, art, music and food.

Morning at Popular Museums

Naturhistorisches Museum and Kunsthistorisches Museum are two identical museum buildings that date back to the 19th century and are home to the Habsburgs’ collections. It is quite impossible to see both of them within a couple of hours so you can take your pick – Naturhistorisches has a 29,500-year-old Venus of Willendorf statue and some dinosaur skeletons while Kunsthistorisches has an elaborative collection of art and history.

Walk a few minutes to the Burggarten – a magnificent art nouveau conservatory with a butterfly house and a splendid statue of Mozart built in 1896. From there, it is just 5 minutes to the Vienna State Opera House – take a few photos and appreciate the architecture (come back later in the evening for a live opera concert).

Grab some coffee and a quick bite at nearby Café Mozart, a classic café dating back to 1929.

Afternoon at St. Charles Church and Belvedere Palace

Another masterpiece of baroque churches in Vienna, St. Charles Church is 10 minutes from Café Mozart and is a must-visit. Your ticket also includes an elevator ride to the dome so don’t miss it. If you would like to enjoy a Vivaldi’s Four Seasons concert, book an online ticket for the evening and come back to end your day with a breathtaking classical performance.

On your way to the next attraction, stop by to pay respects at the Soviet War Memorial that honors the martyrs of the Battle of Vienna fought during World War II.

Spend the rest of your afternoon walking around Belvedere Schloss – the former summer residence of Prince Eugene of Savoy which now houses a permanent exhibition of Gustav Klimt’s paintings in the Upper Belvedere and a few temporary exhibitions and restored rooms in the Lower Belvedere.

Evening at the Naschmarket

Urban street at night with traffic. Vienna Naschmarkt

End your second evening at the iconic Naschmarket, not just Vienna’s but Austria’s most famous market for food and related products. In existence since the 16th century, the market area is highly frequented by locals and visitors from all around the world and is a great place for a sumptuous dinner and a few cocktails.

Day 3: Palaces, Shopping and Nightlife

The last couple of days have been filled with endless admiration of Vienna’s history, art, architecture, and music. Are you ready for some more? This is your last day so let’s make the most of it by starting with a delicious breakfast at the famous Waldemar Tagesbar.

Morning at the Schönbrunn Palace

Saving the best till last, the Schönbrunn Palace, with over 1400 rooms is the former summer residence of the Habsburgs and are open to the public (40 of them). Keep the whole morning aside for this because there is a lot to see and do here, for instance, strolling through the enormous gardens, visiting the Gloriette, getting lost (and found) in the Maze, and admiring the Imperial Carriage Museum.

While your at it, attend an Apple Strudel Show to see the process of Viennese apple strudel being made. Wait until the show ends to enjoy a fresh, warm piece.

After spending half a day at the Palace it is only right that you sit down for a nice lunch at one of the two restaurants within the compound.

Afternoon Shopping at Mariahilfer Strasse

Europe as a whole is not an economical destination, so you have to seriously plan your budget if money is a factor during your travels, but that shouldn’t stop you from buying a few souvenirs or treating yourself to some new items of clothing for your wardrobe.

Mariahilfer Strasse is known as the city’s longest and liveliest shopping street so feel free to shop till you drop. The retail heaven can be accessed via an underground train from Schönbrunn and will take about half hour to reach.

Evening Partying at Gürtel Ring Road

Take the underground one more time from Westbahnhof to Josefstädter Straße and find yourself in the heart of Vienna’s thriving nightlife – the Gürtel ring road. The area is packed with well-known bars and clubs such as Chelsea, The Rhiz, Loop, and the B72. Live bands, electronic DJs, chilled lounges, and a great atmosphere – this is how you should spend your last night in Vienna.

Winter Olympics 2018, South Korea: Getting there and getting around

Pyeongchang, South Korea >>>

The upcoming Winter Olympics will bring a lot of people to South Korea for the first time, and most will arrive with little knowledge of the geography or how to get around this small, but incredibly interesting country. Rome2rio can help.

Let’s start with size: South Korea is small. It’s only a third of the size of Germany; a quarter of the size of Japan; and a fifth of the size of California. A train ride from Seoul, near the north-western border with North Korea, to Busan, on the south-eastern coastline, takes only three hours.

Arriving

The cheapest option for getting into Seoul from the airport is the airport train, AREX. Trains leave Incheon International Airport every ten minutes and the journey takes an hour. South Korea has an excellent high speed rail network, including a new service that operates from Incheon International Airport to Seoul — and then out to Gangneung, in the heart of the Olympics zone. These high speed trains (KTX) will leave hourly over the Olympics period, and are a comfortable way to get to the heart of the action.

There are great bus services that runs frequently from the airport, or grab a taxi to your downtown hotel. Both take around an hour or so, depending on traffic.

In Seoul

Within Seoul, you’ll find the extensive and super-clean subway system will get you across town quickly and at low cost, though you won’t see much of the city that way. Taxis are plentiful and cheap, and really are the best way around town if you’d like to actually see the city and not the underground!

Uber, the rideshare service, does operate in Seoul. There’s also a very popular Korean rideshare service, Kakaotaxi, but the service is just the same as hailing a taxi, so unless you speak Korean we wouldn’t suggest downloading their app. Frankly, taxis are everywhere and the fares are reasonable, so that’s our recommendation.

Getting to the games

From Seoul, the KTX train is your best option; Korean Rail have created a special pass that operates from February 1 to March 25, 2018. You can buy your pass here, and although the system is a little tricky you’ll find it’s a lot easier to do the work in advance than to line up and buy one at the station once you’ve arrived.

Once you’ve arrived at the station in Gangneung, you’ll find official and free shuttle buses headed to each of the sporting venues. More information on trains and the shuttle service is available here.

You could rent a car and drive over from Seoul, but there will be loads of restricted areas and no-go zones for private vehicles, while train passengers will enjoy easy access via direct shuttles to every venue. Take the train!

Heading further afield

You’ve come all this way, why not see a little more of this beautiful country? The trip down to Busan, a coastal city with over 3 million people, is relaxing, scenic and not at all like the zombie apocalypse film Train to Busan which set the box-office alight when it appeared in 2016. Relax, it’s just a movie.

You could have another type of adventure, though, with a visit to the DMZ between North and South Korea. Making headlines nowadays, the DMZ is well worth a visit, although to do so you’ll need to buy a spot on an organised tour. You can find more information about the DMZ and tours here. Go on, live dangerously!

Three Days in Lisbon

Lisbon, Portugal >>>

Lisbon, the capital and the largest city of Portugal, is no longer an under-the-radar tourist destination. A city in Europe, Lisbon’s postcard-perfect cobbled streets, ancient structures, magnificent cathedrals, a majestic castle, red-tiled rooftops and an undiluted Portuguese culture makes it a beautiful destination for a 3 day getaway.

One of the best ways to explore the city is on foot. However, for those who plan to use public transport, Viva Viagem and the Lisboa Card are tourist card options that can be taken advantage of.

It is good to note that many tourist places in Lisbon allow free admission on Sundays and are most likely to be closed on Mondays.

An extra (but highly useful) tip is to follow the signs stating “Miradouro” whenever you see them. A Miradouro is a viewpoint and in Lisbon there are plenty of them offering spectacular panoramic views of the city and its river. Also, the city’s terrain is mostly hilly and cobbled so wearing comfortable flat shoes is recommended.

This 3 days in Lisbon itinerary covers all the bases and gives you the opportunity to see a mix of everything that the capital has to offer.

Shopping, Main Squares & Elevador de Santa Justa

There is no better way of starting your first day in Lisbon than grabbing a breakfast at the historic A Brasileira, in business since 1905. Feast on a pastel de nata (Portuguese egg tart) and a coffee as you appreciate the grand façade of Igreja dos Mártires, Basilica of Our Lady of the Martyrs.

Praca do Comercio

Why not continue the beginning of your trip with a bit of shopping? Since you’re in the area, you can’t miss a stroll through the shopping streets of Rua Garrett. From here, a gentle 5-7 minutes’ walk takes you to Praca do Comercio – the main square of Lisbon and your gateway to Lower Town a.k.a. Baixa. At its heart is the statuette of Dom Jose – Lisbon’s King during the devastating earthquake of 1755 and the subsequent resurrection of the city. Also, on the sightseeing radar is the mosaic-paved Praca Municipio – Lisbon’s City Hall and one of the most attractive structures in the city.

Next, enter the area of Baixa via the colossal arch of Arco da Rua Augusta. Beyond the arch is Rua Augusta – the main avenue of Baixa which offers more shopping options should you fancy it. Take a stroll around the cobbled streets or make your way to one of the iconic elevators of Lisbon – Elevador de Santa Justa. Climb up the narrow spiral staircase for even better views, take a few photos and enjoy a drink at the tower’s café before heading back down to the streets of Baixa.

Cherry Liquer, More Squares & Breathtaking Views

Start your afternoon visiting the Convento do Carmo – a beautiful 15th century Gothic monastery, partially destroyed in the earthquake. From here you can easily walk to Praca Dom Pedro IV (or Rossio), a large square in Baxia with a huge fountain, the impressive National Theatre, and plenty of cafes lining the perimeter. This is a perfect spot for grabbing a coffee or afternoon beer in the sun.

You can’t leave Lisbon without tasting Portugal’s famous Cherry Liquer. You could try at any of the local bars but nearby A Ginghina is not only recommended but considered a landmark in the city. Go try some!

From here, you could walk to Praca dos Restauradores – a square dotted with many stunning historical structures, cafés, and shopping avenues.

Miradouro de Sao Pedro de Alcantara & Barrio Alto

Skyline of Lisbon from Sao Pedro de Alcantara viewpoint. Portugal

A pleasant 10 minutes’ walk from Praca dos Restauradores brings you to the foot of Elevador da Gloria – another iconic elevator. The elevator was built in 1885 and takes you up a very steep hill to Miradouro de Sao Pedro de Alcantara – a stunning viewpoint that offers picturesque views of Lower Town and its castle (which you will visit tomorrow).

You are now in Bairro Alto, the most happening place in the city for nightlife. Enjoy a delightful Portuguese dinner and a glass of Portuguese port wine and then take a walk around the narrow streets until you find a cocktail bar that takes your fancy. There are plenty to choose from!

Tram#28 & São Jorge Castle

Make your way to Baixa-Chiado Metro and hop on the historic Tram 28, a must do while in Lisbon. Get to the station as early as possible because the queue for Tram 28 seems to grow by the minute and each tram can fit only 30 passengers. Enjoy the ride as the tram ascends the hilly terrain of Graca with remarkable views of the city and its lesser known corners.

Hop off at Largo da Graça and head towards Miradouro da Graca – another marvelous viewpoint with lovely views of Castelo de Sao Jorge. From the Miradouro, walk down towards the primitive village of Santa Cruz – a city inside a city, separated from the rest of Lisbon due to its altitude and the strong walls built by the Moors.

The next stop is the São Jorge Castle – the most frequented tourist sight in Lisbon (buy advance tickets to skip the queue). Spend an hour inside the compound which offers more breathtaking views of Lisbon.

Alfama Old Town

Grab some lunch at one of the many eateries that line the street from São Jorge Castle to your next destination – Miradouro de Santa Luzia. Check out the ancient church next to the viewpoint and enjoy great views of Alfama Old Town.

Alfama is where Lisbon began and is characterized by a network of charming alleyways, cobbled streets, small squares and endless staircases. It’s as though Alfama has been frozen in time. While wandering through the maze of lanes, head over to Igreja de Sao Miguel – a Spanish-style basilica that dramatically stands out amidst the ancient structures of the Alfama district.

Lisbon’s beautiful main cathedral is close by, simply known as Sé. Sé is free to enter and is well worth a visit to see it’s gorgeous interior.

A short couple of minutes’ walk from the Cathedral is Pois Café, a recommended and popular spot for lunch and relaxation. Grab one of their many books on display and settle in for a while.

A Fado Music Dinner

It’s worth staying in Alfama for the evening as the district is even more pretty once the sun goes down and the dimly lit lanterns begin to light up the streets. Alfama is also a great area to enjoy a romantic dinner. The narrow lanes are full of cosy restaurants cooking up local Portuguese dishes such as grilled sardines. Many of these eateries also offer live Fado musicians for an authentic Portuguese atmosphere.

There are many small and hidden Fado restaurants to choose from but for something on a larger performance scale head to the popular venues of Páteo de Alfama or Clube de Fado.

Time-Out Market & Arrival in Belém

Start the first part of your last day in Lisbon with a light breakfast because soon after you should take a quick visit to the prominent Time-Out Market (opens 10:00AM). The market is a great place to buy some local snacks to either eat in the warehouse type eating area or take away with you to enjoy later in the day. Time-Out Market is also a great place to spend an evening with it staying open until 2AM on weekends.

Across the marketplace is Cais do Sodre rail station from where you hop on the Tram #15 and make your way to the historic riverside district of Belém.

Make your way to Mosteiro dos Jeronimos, a 16th century monastery commemorating Vasco de Gama’s epic voyage and also his final resting place. A few minutes walk is another landmark – Padrao dos Descobrimentos, constructed in honor of Prince Henry. From here, you can also catch a glimpse of the impressive Ponte de 25 Abril, a replica of the Golden Gate Bridge.

More Belém & the Botanical Gardens of Ajuda

As the early afternoon arrives, stroll the pleasing riverside area towards Torre de Belem – a 16th century tower which acted as a fortress and a prison during rivalries. For lunch, Rua Vieira Portuense has streets filled with genuine Portuguese restaurants. Floresta de Belem is a good and inexpensive option.

After lunch, take a 15-minute walk uphill to Jardim Botânico da Ajuda, also known as the Botanical Gardens of Ajuda. Established in the 18th century, the gardens house eight flawlessly manicured sections, collections of trees from all across the globe, and multiple fountains and terraces. The gardens offer a great chance to relax before you hop on the historic Tram #18 one more time.

Miradouro de Santa Catarina and Back to Barrio Alto

Get off Tram #18 in front of Mercado da Ribeira and take the Elevador da Bica to Bairro Alto. Walk 5 minutes to another scenic vantage point, Miradouro de Santa Catarina. Embrace outstanding evening views of the city while enjoying a glass of fresh Sagres (local beer).

Barrio Alto really is the best area to spend your evenings so we recommend hanging around here again for your last night in Lisbon. Try another restaurant and bar that you didn’t get to experience on your first night and if you’re young and energetic, head to one of the many nightclubs. Incógnito and A Capela are two extremely popular options.

Or take our earlier recommendation of soaking up the evening atmosphere at Time Out Market (take a taxi). With plenty of bars and dining options there too it’s a great place to spend a night with locals and tourists.